Tag Archives: nature

High on the Downs

Long grasses sift the evening wind
scent it with pollens
stars prickle through high cloud

somewhere, Skylark still sings
finishing the day shift
elsewhere, Owl calls
announcing night

dusk empties the land
of humanity
all close together
in their dim shelters

here on the ridge
Hare comes close
closer
black tipped ears erect

we return her stare
for what seems
forever

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Written for this weeks  earthweal weekly challenge: SPIRITS OF PLACE

Scrabbling

I am scrabbling for a word
To describe the noise of chickens
Scrabbling in the garden

It isn’t rustling
The leaves above are doing that
Rustle is a high pitched word
I need a lower pitch
Mustle, grustle
Tustle is what one hen is doing with a worm

Now there’s a sudden outbreak of snail football
The snail always loses

It’s life

On this sunny afternoon
Maybe it’s scrabbling after all

Copyright © 2017 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Flockdown has ended here in England, my hens can now roam across the garden once more!

Beloved Hills

Fathoms of microcreatures
that once lived bright lives
in an ancient topographic ocean
died, drifted, finally settled
into dark abyssal depths
in unfathomable time they
dried, were compressed,
eventually uplifted
became the chalk that
now underlies the rich flowery turf
of my beloved hills

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

This is a Quadrille, written in response to a prompt on Dverse, where we had to use the word ‘chalk’ somewhere in our poem.

I feel like I have cheated a bit, as many of my poems are about the chalk hills of southern England. For example:

Friday Poem: All nature has a feeling

All nature has a feeling: woods, fields, brooks
Are life eternal: and in silence they
Speak happiness beyond the reach of books;
There’s nothing mortal in them; their decay
Is the green life of change; to pass away
And come again in blooms revivified.
Its birth was heaven, eternal it its stay,
And with the sun and moon shall still abide
Beneath their day and night and heaven wide.

by John Clare — “the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced.”

Friday Poem: The Sun Rising

Busy old fool, unruly sun,
Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains call on us?
Must to thy motions lovers’ seasons run?
Saucy pedantic wretch, go chide
Late school boys and sour prentices,
Go tell court huntsmen that the king will ride,
Call country ants to harvest offices,
Love, all alike, no season knows nor clime,
Nor hours, days, months, which are the rags of time.

Thy beams, so reverend and strong
Why shouldst thou think?
I could eclipse and cloud them with a wink,
But that I would not lose her sight so long;
If her eyes have not blinded thine,
Look, and tomorrow late, tell me
Whether both th’ Indias of spice and mine
Be where thou leftst them, or lie here with me.
Ask for those kings whom thou saw’st yesterday,
And thou shalt hear, All here in one bed lay.

She’s all states, and all princes, I,
Nothing else is.
Princes do but play us; compared to this,
All honor’s mimic, all wealth alchemy.
Thou, sun, art half as happy as we,
In that the world’s contracted thus.
Thine age asks ease, and since thy duties be
To warm the world, that’s done in warming us.
Shine here to us, and thou art everywhere;
This bed thy center is, these walls, thy sphere.

by John Donne

Donne is my favourite poet.

My poem in Hedgehog Press Anthology

Yay! I’m delighted to announce that my poem, Hedgehogs, be not seen , is in the latest anthology from Hedgehog Press and that it is now available to pre-order.

The title of this anthology is The Song of the Hedgehog:

Pre-Order: – “The Song of the Hedgehog” – Various Artists – The Hedgehog Poetry Press (hedgehogpress.co.uk)

Thank you Mark, for taking my poem, which is written from the point of view of a hedgehog looking for love……

The title , Hedgehogs, be not seen , is from Shakespeare.

The future calls

We must wake, as bears deep in dank caves
rise from hibernation into the light

Swap our screens constant siren call
for the green that cools, shelters and provides

Emerge from a long winter of the soul
where we have craved instant dopamine rewards

Examine the wounds of inequity
speak with true respect, act compassionately

Rewild ourselves along with the land
reject small shuffling lives

Find wonder and delight in our world
Unleash our true creativity, make and think

Put time, hearts, money into the future
before she burns away


Plant our imaginations in the Earth
root our fancies in science

Consider the dance of twisting chemical bonds
how seasalt makes clouds reflect heat into Space

We can grow featherweight turbine blades
using CO2 captured from the air

Make wearable solar panels
nurture plants, insects, animals

Create wonders and delight
to cool a warming world

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

This poem has been written in response to this weeks prompt over at Earthweal.

As part of the COP26 Conference in Glasgow last year, Ingrid applied to host a Community Assembly on the climate and ecological crisis – as part of the overall Global Assembly.

The aim of the Global Assembly is to support citizens from around the world to learn about and discuss the climate and ecological crisis and to provide guiding principles for climate action to world leaders.

We are all invited to contribute. So come join us!

The question we have been asked to deliberate by the Global Assembly is this:  “How can humanity address the climate and ecological crisis in a fair and effective way?”

This poem is my small answer….

Please join in! Post a response to Ingrid’s question on your blog and put the link up at Mr Linky . More details over at Earthweal.