Category Archives: Wild life

High on the Downs

Long grasses sift the evening wind
scent it with pollens
stars prickle through high cloud

somewhere, Skylark still sings
finishing the day shift
elsewhere, Owl calls
announcing night

dusk empties the land
of humanity
all close together
in their dim shelters

here on the ridge
Hare comes close
closer
black tipped ears erect

we return her stare
for what seems
forever

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Written for this weeks  earthweal weekly challenge: SPIRITS OF PLACE

The future calls

We must wake, as bears deep in dank caves
rise from hibernation into the light

Swap our screens constant siren call
for the green that cools, shelters and provides

Emerge from a long winter of the soul
where we have craved instant dopamine rewards

Examine the wounds of inequity
speak with true respect, act compassionately

Rewild ourselves along with the land
reject small shuffling lives

Find wonder and delight in our world
Unleash our true creativity, make and think

Put time, hearts, money into the future
before she burns away


Plant our imaginations in the Earth
root our fancies in science

Consider the dance of twisting chemical bonds
how seasalt makes clouds reflect heat into Space

We can grow featherweight turbine blades
using CO2 captured from the air

Make wearable solar panels
nurture plants, insects, animals

Create wonders and delight
to cool a warming world

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

This poem has been written in response to this weeks prompt over at Earthweal.

As part of the COP26 Conference in Glasgow last year, Ingrid applied to host a Community Assembly on the climate and ecological crisis – as part of the overall Global Assembly.

The aim of the Global Assembly is to support citizens from around the world to learn about and discuss the climate and ecological crisis and to provide guiding principles for climate action to world leaders.

We are all invited to contribute. So come join us!

The question we have been asked to deliberate by the Global Assembly is this:  “How can humanity address the climate and ecological crisis in a fair and effective way?”

This poem is my small answer….

Please join in! Post a response to Ingrid’s question on your blog and put the link up at Mr Linky . More details over at Earthweal.

Crossing the park, 11am Monday

Scattered folds of night
litter bright mown grasses
spring up into the air
startled, flapping
at our arrival

We watch them wheel and
turn above us
spot a Red Kite floating high
turn again, caw to each other
settle under advantageous trees

Kite eats carrion not crow

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

For this week’s earthweal challenge, we are asked to “write of WILD MIND. How does green fire take root in the thought of our poems?”

I am offering up a little vignette of parkife here in my small town. After a morning of Internet research for a local project, I took a walk, and was lifted by my local birds.

Heavy on the wing, the  albatross approaches the rock

She soars ridges and slopes in the air
sees its fluid shape in in her pale yellow eye
dances on winds, a long haul tourist

She needs the lift of the air to live
maybe she brings the wind with her
to this vertical face of dead mosses and nests

Now at the rock, she dances on once more
this time to a lover, long unseen
looks forward, after so many years on the wing

to the earthbound pleasures of children
and a future

Copyright © 2021 Kim Whysall-Hammond

My Cheese seller challenged me to write a poem with his title…….

To Ham Hill and Beyond

The lanes are lined with lace
Cow Parsley that sways and dances as we pass
our prayer wheel tyres turn and
charge our journey with significance

We dive deep into low green tree tunnels
where gnarled heat-seeking branches
reach out, over and above

Rise to a downland sea of many grasses
arrayed with sheep and bleating lambs
where the horizon is calling
to take us away

Copyright © 2021 Kim Whysall-Hammond

In The Rain

A brilliant poem from Glenys about a Blackbird in the rain:

lifecameos

In steady light rain
low clouds compress
the light’s dull glare.
The blackbird’s feathers
sparkle under their fine cloak
of minute droplets.
His chuckles, shrieks of glee
from the clothesline pole
fill the garden as he raises
his head half spreads his wings
in the sensual joy
of tiny moist diamonds.

Previously posted January 2016.

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A Rainbow Octopus

Not the poetry of words, but certainly the poetry of motion. A stunning video of a Rainbow Octopus from Aesthesiamag :

AesthesiaMag

https://octolab.tv/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Untitled-design-2019-08-09T120305.757.jpghttps://vg5b2ejdwb-flywheel.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/tremoctopus-blanket-octopus-lembeh-straight.jpghttps://vg5b2ejdwb-flywheel.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/maxresdefault-66-e1581609796567.jpg

More info: NAD-Lembeh.com | Facebook | YouTube

In a short clip captured during a blackwater night dive in the Lembeh Strait, a blanket octopus unfolds and displays a colorful web multiple times her original size. The aquatic animal’s iridescent body and tentacles glow against the nighttime water before she releases her translucent blanket that connects her dorsal and dorsolateral arms. Only adult females are equipped with the lengthy membrane that reaches as long as six feet and dwarfs male octopi, which are less than an inch in size and most often die immediately after mating. Generally, the females only unfurl their color-changing blankets to appear larger and more intimidating to potential predators. Shared by NAD Lembeh Resort, the underwater video was taken on a RED Gemini with a 50 millimeter Zeiss Macro lens. You might also want to check out this footage of a blanket octopus in waters near…

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