Category Archives: speculative poetry

My poem “The Ancient of Days” published in The Fantastic Other

I am delighted to announce that my poem “The Ancient of Days” has been published in Issue 4 of The Fantastic Other magazine.

The issue can be read here:

the-fantastic-other-issue-04-1.pdf (wordpress.com)

Many thanks to the editor, G. E. Butler, and his team for publishing my poem.

The Colours of the Night

Not blackpurple or midnight blue
but rose from Betelgeuse
and the diamndsharp blue of Sirius

Ruby taillights on the move
those bright green leaves
lit up by streetlights, headlights

Nights colours are many and varied
as are those of its special creatures
now behind you, ready to feed

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

“Carve it in Doves and Pomegranates” published today in Utopia Science Fiction Magazine

I am delighted to announce that my poem “Carve it in Doves and Pomegranates” has been published in Utopia Science Fiction Magazine’s February/March Issue (2022).

You can find a copy available here.

50% of sales from this issue will be donated to the UNHCR (United Nations Refugee Agency). A United Nations charity which collects funds to provide humanitarian aid to families displaced by conflicts around the world, including Ukraine

Something Follows

We walk in winterbare sunbright woods
a winding path that skirts fallen trees
sprawling bramble thickets
and forms its own linear ponds
where frogs protest our passage

I hear a clinking
high pitched, sharp, intermittent
and somewhere behind

Nothing in our gear is metallic and loose
I hear the noise, but he doesn’t
when I stop to listen, he is confused
stumbles into me
our path follows a millennium-old ditch
and I begin to suspect the noise comes from there
but the ditch contains only brown beech leaves

When we stop, the clinks stop
When we walk once more
clink clink clink after a small wait

Sun shafts through clawing branches
strange rustles lurk under leafdrifts
our pleasant walk reforms
mutates
into else and other

The clinks are always there
as long as we are beside the ditch
always
something follows

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

A real-life ghost story, shared for the open link weeked at Earthweal.

Poem published in Star*Line

I’m delighted to be able to tell you that my poem The Fading of Yellow has been published in the Science Fiction Poetry Association house magazine, Star*Line.

Star*Line is a print magazine, but several poems from each issue are also shared online, and today one of them is mine!

You can read my poem by clicking on the link below, looking down the Table of Contents for my poem (highlighted in green), then clicking on the poem title:

https://www.sfpoetry.com/sl/issues/starline45.1.html

My edible home has no gingerbread

Its colours are cold and serious
and the clocks stopped a long time ago

Being alone for a long time
I have started to listen differently

Everything turns outward
but I turn up in all the wrong places

The witch is never dead
just sitting lonely in her edible home

Copyright © 2021 Kim Whysall-Hammond

My Cheese seller challenged me to write a poem with this title…….

My poem ‘Or by Inaction’ published by Granfalloon

I’m delighted to announce that my Science Fiction poem ‘Or by Inaction’ has been published by Granfalloon:

𝗢𝗿 𝗯𝘆 𝗜𝗻𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻… (granfalloon.org)

First Law of Robotics: A robot shall not harm a human being, or, by inaction, allow a human being come to harm

My thanks to Albert Mamet and Fiona Chew-Mcleod for accepting this poem which sees the First Law of Robotics from the robots point of view.

Dribbleberry

The dribbleberry was aptly named
its juces do not easily wash off
and stain your cheeks and chin for days

Long orange dribbles adorn the face of my toddler
as he skips around the settlement
in that warm misty sunshine that is too pink

Rainy days soothe my longing for home
for then I do not see our double suns
can try to forget a faraway Earth

Where I once picked blackberries
rasberries, apples and pears

Copyright © 2021 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Writtten in response to the prompt over at Dverse: