Category Archives: nature

Pruning

Our blousey algebraist rose
has scrambled, fingers outstretched
up into trees, along the fence,
twisted through a rival honeysuckle
like frantic cancer.
After years of decorous ornamenting
a strike for sovereignty, a garden takeover.
So I now prune and clip, curtail the party
while mourning all these soft pink flowers.

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Friday Poem: Kinship

Very slowly burning, the big forest tree
stands in the slight hollow of the snow
melted around it by the mild, long
heat of its being and its will to be
root, trunk, branch, leaf, and know
earth dark, sun light, wind touch, bird song.

Rootless and restless and warmblooded, we
blaze in the flare that blinds us to that slow,
tall, fraternal fire of life as strong
now as in the seedling two centuries ago.

by Ursula Le Guin

A poem for Fake Flamencos June challenge

This poem is in the form of a naani poem. Naani means: expressing one and all in theTelugu language. This form originated in India from the Telugu poet, Dr. N. Gopi. A naani has four lines with a total of 20-25 syllables and no title. It was written for Rebecca over at Fake Flamenco as part of her June Poetry Challenge :

Grey dawn is a stranger
Yet I remember
Gulls on a clay flat beach
Frost sparkling a forbidden lawn

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

High on the Downs

Long grasses sift the evening wind
scent it with pollens
stars prickle through high cloud

somewhere, Skylark still sings
finishing the day shift
elsewhere, Owl calls
announcing night

dusk empties the land
of humanity
all close together
in their dim shelters

here on the ridge
Hare comes close
closer
black tipped ears erect

we return her stare
for what seems
forever

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Written for this weeks  earthweal weekly challenge: SPIRITS OF PLACE

The future calls

We must wake, as bears deep in dank caves
rise from hibernation into the light

Swap our screens constant siren call
for the green that cools, shelters and provides

Emerge from a long winter of the soul
where we have craved instant dopamine rewards

Examine the wounds of inequity
speak with true respect, act compassionately

Rewild ourselves along with the land
reject small shuffling lives

Find wonder and delight in our world
Unleash our true creativity, make and think

Put time, hearts, money into the future
before she burns away


Plant our imaginations in the Earth
root our fancies in science

Consider the dance of twisting chemical bonds
how seasalt makes clouds reflect heat into Space

We can grow featherweight turbine blades
using CO2 captured from the air

Make wearable solar panels
nurture plants, insects, animals

Create wonders and delight
to cool a warming world

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

This poem has been written in response to this weeks prompt over at Earthweal.

As part of the COP26 Conference in Glasgow last year, Ingrid applied to host a Community Assembly on the climate and ecological crisis – as part of the overall Global Assembly.

The aim of the Global Assembly is to support citizens from around the world to learn about and discuss the climate and ecological crisis and to provide guiding principles for climate action to world leaders.

We are all invited to contribute. So come join us!

The question we have been asked to deliberate by the Global Assembly is this:  “How can humanity address the climate and ecological crisis in a fair and effective way?”

This poem is my small answer….

Please join in! Post a response to Ingrid’s question on your blog and put the link up at Mr Linky . More details over at Earthweal.

Stone in Water

Deep plunge pool in the heart of the moor
Centred in spring time unfurling of bracken
Shadowed by a twisted thorn tree
Water pours in over a mossy lip
Large pebbles line the sloping
Glowing colours in crystal water

Something falls
Breaks the surface
Circles upon circles radiate
Contours ripple to a point of disappearance
Sparkle in the dawn light
Stone in the water

Copyright © 2016 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Crossing the park, 11am Monday

Scattered folds of night
litter bright mown grasses
spring up into the air
startled, flapping
at our arrival

We watch them wheel and
turn above us
spot a Red Kite floating high
turn again, caw to each other
settle under advantageous trees

Kite eats carrion not crow

Copyright © 2022 Kim Whysall-Hammond

For this week’s earthweal challenge, we are asked to “write of WILD MIND. How does green fire take root in the thought of our poems?”

I am offering up a little vignette of parkife here in my small town. After a morning of Internet research for a local project, I took a walk, and was lifted by my local birds.