Category Archives: Data Networks

Broken Cable

In the middle of the bright Atlantic
Floating on the swell between island volcanoes
Beneath reflective surface tension
Silvered gas bubbles catch the light
And, across the issuing rift
A long snake of data cable
Broken sheared twisted

As the gas breaks the surface
We hear voices
Blogs bubbling to the top
Instructions to buy or sell
A thousand tiny voices
Sparkling in the sunshine
Several parrot fish swim by
Next day when snorkeling
I fancy I hear fish blogging

Copyright © 2016 Kim Whysall-Hammond

This poem was published by the wonderful Helen Ivory on Ink, Sweat and Tears:  http://www.inksweatandtears.co.uk/pages/?p=12491

Present Future

The machine just doesn’t stop
but clambers across and smothers real life

capturing privacies, swapping
small unregarded freedoms

for Dopamine flash rewards
and  a watered down electronic

recognition of sorts.
The screen’s constant siren call

replacing small intimacies
for others not yet evaluated.

Interconnected yet further apart,
we stumble on into the present future.

Copyright © 2018 Kim Whysall-Hammond

This poem was first published by the Sunlight Press: https://www.thesunlightpress.com/…/20…/10/30/present-future/

Poetry on the internet

Many of us share poetry on the internet, either our own or others. Did you know that there is an internet standard regarding poetry? I’ve included it below, although you may be somewhat suspicious once you spot the publication date. Please forgive me if its all Greek to you. I happen to speak this sort of thing!

This is a genuine RFC. But for some reason of other, it’s not, to my knowledge been used……

Note for the non geek: A Request for Comments (RFC) is a formal document from the Internet Engineering Task Force ( IETF ) that is the result of committee drafting and subsequent review by interested parties. Some RFCs are informational in nature. Of those that are intended to become Internet standards, the final version of the RFC becomes the standard and no further comments or changes are permitted. Change can occur, however, through subsequent RFCs that supersede or elaborate on all or parts of previous RFCs.

————————————————————————–

Network Working Group                                                              W. Shakespeare
Request for Comments: 1605                                                     Globe Communications
Category: Informational                                                              1 April 1994

SONET to Sonnet Translation

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo
does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of
this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

Because Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) transmits data in frames
of bytes, it is fairly easy to envision ways to compress SONET frames
to yield higher bandwidth over a given fiber optic link. This memo
describes a particular method, SONET Over Novel English Translation
(SONNET).

Protocol Overview

In brief, SONNET is a method for compressing 810-byte (9 lines by 90
bytes) SONET OC-1 frames into approximately 400-byte (fourteen line
decasyllabic) English sonnets. This compression scheme yields a
roughly 50% average compression, and thus SONNET compression speeds
are designated OCh-#, where ‘h’ indicates 50% (one half) compression
and the # is the speed of the uncompressed link. The acronym is
pronounced “owch.”

Mapping of the 2**704 possible SONET payloads is achieved by matching
each possible payload pattern with its equivalent Cerf catalog number
(see [1], which lists a vast number of sonnets in English, many of
which are truly terrible but suffice for the purposes of this memo).

Basic Transmission Rules

The basic transmission rules are quite simple. The basic SONET OC-1
frame is replaced with the corresponding sonnet at the transmission
end converted back from the sonnet to SONET at the receiving end.
Thus, for example, SONET frame 12 is transmitted as:

When do I count the clock that tells the time
And see the brave day sunk in hideous night;
When I behold the violet past prime,
And sable curls,…

For rates higher than OC-1, the OC-1 frames may either come
interleaved or concatenated into larger frames. Under SONNET
conversion rules, interleaved frames have their corresponding sonnet
representations interleaved. Thus SONET frames 33, 29 and 138 in an
OC-3 frame would be converted to the sequence:

Full many a glorious morning have I seen
When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,
When my loves swears that she is made of truth
Flatter the mountain-tops with sovereign eye
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
I do believe her, though I know she lies
Kissing with golden face…

while in an OC-3c frame, the individual OC-1 frames concatenated, one
after another, viz.:

Full many a glorious morning have I seen Flatter the mountain-
tops with sovereign eye Kissing with golden face…

When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes, I all alone
beweep my outcast state,…

When my loves swears that she is made of truth I do believe her,
though I know she lies…

(This example, perhaps, makes clear why data communications experts
consider concatenated SONET more efficient and esthetically
pleasing).

Timing Issues

It is critical in this translation scheme to maintain consistent
timing within a frame. If SONET frames or converted sonnets shift in
time, the SONET pointers, or worse, poetic meter, may suffer.

References

[1] Cerf, B., “A Catalog of All Published English Sonnets to 1950”,
Random House, 1953. (Now out of print.)

Security Considerations

Security issues are not discussed in this memo.

Author’s Address

William Shakespeare
Globe Communications
London, United Kingdom

Any suggestions that this, or any other work by this author, might
be the work of a third party such as C. Marlow, R. Bacon, or
C. Partridge or based on a previously developed theme by
P.V. Mockapetris are completely spurious.

Royal Edinburgh Observatory

Royal Edinburgh Observatory

Poor lost instrument, trapped in your tower
Where the dome never opens from year to year.
They no longer use you to search the heavens
Battered and bruised, missing parts, you lurk in the darkness of your cage
If only I could find glass plates, unwrap them in the dark, open the dome and set you free

  Copyright © 2015  Kim Whysall-Hammond

Re-blogged from 2015.

An insecure heart? Broken controls

I love poems that use scientific or science fictional imagery. And I’ve shared some with you, whether by other poets (The Migration of Darkness, Wrecks) or by me (Nebula, Broken Cable, Sun Queen, Royal Edinburgh Observatory).

 Well here’s one that uses imagery from my profession – IT and Data Networking. And it’s a fantastic love poem!

Broken Controls

existing firewall rules
are ineffective to prevent
intrusion

distributed denial-of-service attack
is launched,
flooding the heart –
causing malfunction,
disconnecting communication channel
with the brain

the heart left open,
love virus gets to work
spreading new sensations
which take deep roots,
taking over controls
in a matter of minutes

by the time
incident report is lodged
and root cause analysis
completed,
the heart’s assets
have been sieged, and the brain
no longer
rules

In computing, a firewall is a network security system that monitors and controls the incoming and ongoing network traffic based on pre-detemined access security rules.
Distributed denial-of-service attack is an attempt to make a machine unavailable to its intended users, e.g. by “flooding” the bandwidth or resources of a targeted system, eventually causing the system to crash. 

Poem by Anna at https://whatthewomanwrote.wordpress.com/2016/01/28/broken-controls/

Picture by By William Viker – My Opera devblog, Attribution, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1351332

Broken cable

Broken Cable

In the middle of the bright Atlantic
Floating on the swell between island volcanoes
Beneath reflective surface tension
Silvered gas bubbles catch the light
And, across the issuing rift,
A long snake of data cable
Broken sheared twisted.

As the gas breaks the surface
We hear voices
Blogs bubbling to the top
Instructions to buy or sell
A thousand tiny voices
Sparkling in the sunshine
Several parrot fish swim by
Next day when snorkeling
I fancy I hear fish blogging

 

Copyright © 2016 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Royal Edinburgh Observatory

 

Royal Edinburgh Observatory

 

Poor lost instrument, trapped in your tower

Where the dome never opens from year to year.

They no longer use you to search the heavens

Battered and bruised, missing parts, you lurk in the darkness of your cage

If only I could find glass plates, unwrap them in the dark open the dome and set you free

 

       Copyright © 2015  Kim Whysall-Hammond

Poetry on the internet

Many of us share poetry on the internet, either our own or others. Did you know that there is an internet standard regarding poetry? I’ve included it below, although, you may be suspicious once you spot the publication date. Please forgive me if its all Greek to you. I happen to speak this sort of thing!

This is a genuine RFC. But for some reason of other, it’s not, to my knowledge been used……

Note for the non geek: A Request for Comments (RFC) is a formal document from the Internet Engineering Task Force ( IETF ) that is the result of committee drafting and subsequent review by interested parties. Some RFCs are informational in nature. Of those that are intended to become Internet standards, the final version of the RFC becomes the standard and no further comments or changes are permitted. Change can occur, however, through subsequent RFCs that supersede or elaborate on all or parts of previous RFCs.

————————————————————————–

Network Working Group                                                              W. Shakespeare
Request for Comments: 1605                                                     Globe Communications
Category: Informational                                                              1 April 1994

SONET to Sonnet Translation

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. This memo
does not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of
this memo is unlimited.

Abstract

Because Synchronous Optical Network (SONET) transmits data in frames
of bytes, it is fairly easy to envision ways to compress SONET frames
to yield higher bandwidth over a given fiber optic link. This memo
describes a particular method, SONET Over Novel English Translation
(SONNET).

Protocol Overview

In brief, SONNET is a method for compressing 810-byte (9 lines by 90
bytes) SONET OC-1 frames into approximately 400-byte (fourteen line
decasyllabic) English sonnets. This compression scheme yields a
roughly 50% average compression, and thus SONNET compression speeds
are designated OCh-#, where ‘h’ indicates 50% (one half) compression
and the # is the speed of the uncompressed link. The acronym is
pronounced “owch.”

Mapping of the 2**704 possible SONET payloads is achieved by matching
each possible payload pattern with its equivalent Cerf catalog number
(see [1], which lists a vast number of sonnets in English, many of
which are truly terrible but suffice for the purposes of this memo).

Basic Transmission Rules

The basic transmission rules are quite simple. The basic SONET OC-1
frame is replaced with the corresponding sonnet at the transmission
end converted back from the sonnet to SONET at the receiving end.
Thus, for example, SONET frame 12 is transmitted as:

When do I count the clock that tells the time
And see the brave day sunk in hideous night;
When I behold the violet past prime,
And sable curls,…

For rates higher than OC-1, the OC-1 frames may either come
interleaved or concatenated into larger frames. Under SONNET
conversion rules, interleaved frames have their corresponding sonnet
representations interleaved. Thus SONET frames 33, 29 and 138 in an
OC-3 frame would be converted to the sequence:

Full many a glorious morning have I seen
When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,
When my loves swears that she is made of truth
Flatter the mountain-tops with sovereign eye
I all alone beweep my outcast state,
I do believe her, though I know she lies
Kissing with golden face…

while in an OC-3c frame, the individual OC-1 frames concatenated, one
after another, viz.:

Full many a glorious morning have I seen Flatter the mountain-
tops with sovereign eye Kissing with golden face…

When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes, I all alone
beweep my outcast state,…

When my loves swears that she is made of truth I do believe her,
though I know she lies…

(This example, perhaps, makes clear why data communications experts
consider concatenated SONET more efficient and esthetically
pleasing).

Timing Issues

It is critical in this translation scheme to maintain consistent
timing within a frame. If SONET frames or converted sonnets shift in
time, the SONET pointers, or worse, poetic meter, may suffer.

References

[1] Cerf, B., “A Catalog of All Published English Sonnets to 1950”,
Random House, 1953. (Now out of print.)

Security Considerations

Security issues are not discussed in this memo.

Author’s Address

William Shakespeare
Globe Communications
London, United Kingdom

Any suggestions that this, or any other work by this author, might
be the work of a third party such as C. Marlow, R. Bacon, or
C. Partridge or based on a previously developed theme by
P.V. Mockapetris are completely spurious.

A primer for Project Management

Plan, plan and plan again

If I say that once each day, I must say it several times.. .. ..

Well, no I don’t, actually. My favourite sayings tend to vary between,

“WHAT? How Much?!?”
WHY cant you do it on time?”
..and..
“Calm Down. Lets look at the plan again..”

Aha! We did get back to planning. Trust me on this. It is no use relying on the planning software. Like all software, it is only as good as the ideas you put into it. I used to use MS Project a lot. BUT, I would only fire it up when I had just about completed the main work of my planning!

So what is the main work of my planning? A piece of paper covered with lists. More and more I am using a mind map. These are simple ways of interlinking information, developed  long ago when HTML and the web were merely  sparkles in Tim Berners-Lee ‘s eye.

But I digress. What you really need to do at the start of a project (any project) is collate certain information. The success of the project will depend entirely upon how well you do this. What you need to assess/list is:

  • Aims -What are we to achieve?
  • Resources -What do we have to do it with? i.e. people, tools etc.
  • Deliverables -What do we need to end up delivering? This would include software documentation for example
  • Dependencies -What does this project, or the major tasks depend on? Is any other group or persons coming along to help?
  • Risks -Start listing what can go wrong. Put in even the trivial. They are all risks

If you think about this a while, you will see that these are interlinked (hence the mind maps!). Dependencies can create risks. The potential unavailability of a resource (e.g. When is Sues Holiday to Florida?)will be a risk. A deliverable is bound to be one of the aims, surely. And so on.

This series of lists or mind-map will now be the basis of you formal project plan. This is usually NOT the chart beloved of MS Project devotees (formally a Gantt Chart), but a written document with a task list, and perhaps (more often that not) a Gantt chart attached.

You can dispense with the formal plan if you want. You don’t need the Gantt Chart. But ALWAYS do the original listings /mind-maps.Its always served me well.

Chase that Rabbit!

Once a project is underway, you need to make sure it stays that way. So chase! Phone the suppliers for an update. Loom over your programmers. Do whatever is necessary to put the fear of God into all your human ‘risks’ and ‘dependencies’ (but with oodles of charm, of course).

A colleague who shall remain nameless believes that all that is necessary for a successful project is a plan (he only ever does a Gantt chart by the way and so fails to capture any dependencies) and then delegation of the tasks. He moves onto the next project and wonders sometime later why no-one has done anything on his first project!!

Review

This is the elder sister of Chasing. Please review your project(s) and their plans on a regular basis. During a large batch of software testing, my team and I had a weekly Review Meeting (OK, yes, Friday afternoon in the Pub, I admit it). As Project Manager, I placed the plan of that weeks work under their little noses and then forced them to admit to whether they’d actually done any of it, did it work, what remained to be done etc. The beer helped loosen their tongues, yes, but I have an informal style. At my previous employer, it would have all happened via written reports to the IT Director. Yuk. Honesty tends to go out of the window when we talk to higher management.

By the way, the minute you issue a plan, it is out of date.

Is Software Necessary?

This all depends on

  • The size of the project
  • The procedures required by your employer

……in other words, I believe you can manage a small project (say, 10 tasks or less) without software.

……yes yes, I did use MS Project to plan the decoration of our hallway at home. There were over 30 separate tasks, OK?