Category Archives: astronomy

Calling Sky

The unspeakable vastness
of the unconquerable dark
speaks to our hearts
where no harbour beckons
no port waits

A calling sky lids our lives
it shields, shelters
imprisons us
gravity the jailer to be overthrown
the well to climb out of
hand over hand

Climbing to where the only sounds are
a popping of particles
into  matter phase

We will not see stars with our own eyes
nor hear the sounds of space
our travelling world
built of systems noise
ventilation hiss and engine thrum
will seep through our lives
even outside
suit noise and visors will hide
the photons trip

Yet unspeakable vastness
and unconquerable dark
will sink deep into our subconscious
refashioning our very selves
varying what is human

Will we wish to sink once more
into the trap of gravity
or shall we run with the particle streams
out into the dark?

Copyright © 2020 Kim Whysall-Hammond

‘Calling Sky’ was first published by Utopia Science Fiction  in the April 2020 issue.

The Sun Queen

Source of heat and fuel for life
Beautiful at the horizon
Painting clouds and sky
We bask and burn in her glory
And she sits supreme at system centre
Girdled by her planets
Visited by stray comets
Regally burning
Interior electrons impede her light
Rendering our glowing orb opaque
Not that you can see this
It would burn your eyes out

Copyright © 2016  Kim Whysall-Hammond

The moon and the street light

Bone white Moon climbs high over rooftops
ancient scars pockmark her face
scudding clouds drape mystery around
her astronomical mass

Here on my sleep-silent street
halogen is queen, blue-white brilliance
tempered by garden trees that
stroke and wrap their cones of light

The moon sees nothing of this

Copyright © 2021 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Mountains of the Moon

Their high mass tears at
pierces a pale sky
pulls at the high oranges
stealing it for their icy peaks.
As the mother planet rises,
methane snows glint
like golden  crowns.

Copyright © 2019 Kim Whysall-Hammond

‘Mountains of the Moon’ was first published by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Associations print journal Star*Line, October 2019

Telescope

Lurking in a distant corner
That darkly reflective black tube
Of outsize length
Adorned with intricate knobs
And several precise gauges
Alien amongst our bright furnishings

Held tight by many adjustable clamps
It perches on a tall chromed tripod
Close to the door, angled , straining to escape
To collect starlight in its hidden mirrors once again
But now capped and dusty
Ornamental more than used

Copyright © 2020 Kim Whysall-Hammond

I really need to use my Telescope more often!

 

Brief bloom

We are a brief bloom
On the fragile skin
Of a molten body
Encircling a massive furnace

We are a blossoming of sentience
With encrusted technologies
Craving wonder, hoping for company
Seeking knowledge and excitement

We truly are stardust
Our bodies built from atoms
Forged in successive stellar explosions
We crave the glories of the Universe

We are Human

Copyright © 2016 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Orion

Lifting over the horizon comes Orion
stellar giant writ large in the sky
seven winter stars, guiding me on dark nights
heavenly shepard

Rigel, bluebright, ten millions year young
living fast and furious
there at the giants front knee
pushing forward

Great Betelguese smolders
into dying at Orions shoulder
or maybe she’s blown away already
a light six centuries away

Hanging from a three star belt
stars are birthed swaddled in glowing nebulosity
look closely and you see their pinprick natal shine
count them and argue about it

Copyright © 2020 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Glint

Pregnant nebula, embryo stars,
ragged incandescences torn apart
as plasma  bursts from stellar birth.
Deep within amid writhing gas
a glint, metallic gleam,
foreign shapes moving to gravity’s dance,
hulls laced in ancient disaster.
Who, what and why
lost to space-time.
Those who died here
infinitesimally disassociating
stripping to molecular debris
amino acids seeding new planetary nebulae.

Rebirthed on a moon near you.

Copyright © 2019 Kim Whysall-Hammond

‘Glint’ was first published in Trouble Among the Stars Issue 3