Storage issues

Images of distant snowmen
long melted and gone
haunt my eyes.
The heat of other summers
warms my skin
as my feet try to kick through
thirty year old fallen leaves.
It seems my memories are filling my senses.
Is this what is means to grow old?
I have many years yet to go
much more time to forge more memories.
This storage crisis needs to end.

Copyright © 2018 Kim Whysall-Hammond

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Memory 1

Slumping in hot Mediterranean shade
hatless, baked,
contemplating vast sandy ruins,

Walking across hot Gozitan salt pans
sun dazzled,
waves crashing beneath.

Plunging into an oasis
in a brick red  desert,
surprising the locals.

Kayaking on ocean waves
cooling wind in my hair
reaching forward.

Copyright © 2018 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Islands

If every man is an island and each woman too,
what of rising tides and the oncoming sea?
Icebergs drop into frigid waters  releasing their fresh water load
corals bleach and die, damaging encircling protective reefs
plastics pervade our ocean to clog, choke and kill.
A tsunami of ill news, a tempest of emotions.

The tide is coming in,
where is your causeway?

Copyright © 2018 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Time

I have loved you for so long
That the moon has moved measurably in its orbit
Islands have grown, jungles fallen
Empires have been toppled
I loved you as a youth
And now at the apogee of your prime
I love you still

Copyright © 2017 Kim Whysall-Hammond

Re-blogged for Valentines Day

Azores Evening

Moonlight  has banished an ocean of stars,
pouring  molten silver across the water.
Murmuring waves remember a primal ocean,
write poetry in their foam,
erase the day from a busy beach.
A harsh breeze crashes across treetops
as if breaking on a coral reef
and distant sea-birds call evenings end,
sharp disembodied sentinels of the night.

Copyright © 2018 Kim Whysall-Hammond

To be a pilgrim

Who would true valour see,
Let him come hither;
One here will constant be,
Come wind, come weather.
There’s no discouragement
Shall make him once relent
His first avowed intent,
To be a pilgrim.

Whoso beset him round
With dismal stories
Do but themselves confound;
His strength the more is.
No lion can him fright,
He’ll with a giant fight,
But he will have a right
To be a pilgrim.

Hobgoblin, nor foul fiend,
Can daunt his spirit:
He knows, he at the end
Shall life inherit.
Then fancies fly away,
He’ll fear not what men say,
He’ll labour night and day
To be a pilgrim.

John Bunyan

Although I am not religious, I was brought up within the Church of England, and we had a Christian service every morning at school. So I grew  up singing many fine old hymns that stay with me today. One such was ‘To be a pilgrim’ a poem by John Bunyan set to music by  Ralph Vaughan Williams using the traditional Sussex melody “Monk’s Gate“.  I love it deeply and thought I’d share the original poem with you today.

I know several hymns completely to heart, including Blake’s  ‘Jerusalem’ (as all good Englishwomen and cricket lovers should), as well as the lesser known ‘Hills of the North rejoice’.

Its interesting that I remember the poetic ones…..

Hidden Dragon

In deep time when the air was fat with moisture and warmth
you soared in low gravity, swooped over and along deep Marineris
scrabbled amongst rust red rocks, seeking the treasure of tasty morsels.
Then, as the air fizzed away to trail behind your little planets orbit
and the planetary heart chilled to immobility
so you chilled and slowed.
Settling down to a hibernation, waiting the warmth of a spring
that has never come.

Blanketed by wind borne dust you have been slumbering
in your crater nest.
Now those selfsame winds have scoured away your cover
revealing your raised  scales.
Massive glider, hidden dragon.

Copyright © 2018 Kim Whysall-Hammond

(Thank you Nesa, for the idea!)

Bunge Crater Dunes — Fans and ribbons of dark sand dunes creep across the floor of Bunge Crater in response to winds blowing from the direction at the top of the picture. The frame is about 14 kilometers (9 miles) wide. This image was taken in January 2006 by the Thermal Emission Imaging System instrument on NASA’s Mars Odyssey orbiter and posted in a special December 2010 set marking the occasion of Odyssey becoming the longest-working Mars spacecraft in history. The pictured location on Mars is 33.8 degrees south latitude, 311.4 degrees east longitude. Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Arizona State University